Colors of Easter – Candle centerpiece ideas

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Every year as the big holidays like Easter, Christmas and Thanksgiving, people want to create gorgeous centerpieces for family gatherings but are unsure of what colors to use or why.  With Easter in April 8th, I thought it may be a good little discussion for this weekend.  This is by no means a religious post as I feel that many non based faith consumers still reach from traditions they grew up with.  To me holidays are a time to be spent with family, whether it is blood family or the family you choose to surround yourself with like close friends and loves ones.

Let’s chat about colors first.  Purple, pink and white are prominent due to many religious reasons.  Overall Spring seems to bring a time of change and hope of what is to come.

Purple:

The color I remember used most is deep violet-purple.  Purple is the color of royalty and it the color of the garment that covered Jesus when he was taken to the crucifix. Purple symbolizes he is the son of God who many people believe is the King of all and they believe that with the suffering and death of Jesus the coming resurrection and hope of newness will be celebrated in his Resurrection on Easter Sunday. Purple colors symbolize both the pain and suffering leading up to the crucifixion of Jesus as well as the suffering of humanity and the world under sin.  If you are a church goer, remember those rich purple vestments and robes the priests, minister, pastor or reverend wore.  Also, traditionally, purple is a color of penance.  For example, in the Catholic church use this time to repent for the sins of the world. While Baptists choose to focus on  the symbolism of purple as a royal color, representing the coming of Christ the  King.
If you choose to incorporate purple roses into your centerpiece the purple color is mystical in its nature and the symbolism of purple rose is attached to enchantment and desire. It also symbolizes that it is time to proceed with extra care. In that sense, it can be used as a warning too.

Pink:

Pink symbolizes the Rose of Sharon in many faith based beliefs.   It symbolizes joy & happiness.  According to Pastor Harold Dinsmore at  LifeWay.com, this candle symbolizes “Jesus Christ being the One who took upon  Himself the penalty for our sins.”

If you are choosing pink roses for your centerpiece,  a pink rose symbolizes femininity, elegance, refinement, and gentility and it also carries other deep meaning, depending on its color hue. While pale pink shades convey grace and admiration, deep shades convey appreciation and gratitude. Pink rose also has seen as the symbol of joyousness and it is called as the rose of sweet thoughts.

White:

White was the color of the robe that Jesus Christ was wearing he was scourged according to legends, historians, or the bible.  The color white symbolizes the hope of the resurrection, as well as the purity and newness that comes from victory over sin and death.   It also symbolizes holiness, virtue, respect & reverence.  White lily, one of the traditional flowers of Easter, is widely used for decorations of home and premises. It is used to adorn the altar at churches as well.

A large white candle is used at liturgy for Roman Catholic, Lutheran and Anglican and is called the Paschal candle.  The term Paschal  comes from the Hebrew word Pesach which means passover.  It signifies the divine pillar of cloud by day and the pillar of fire by night that lead the Israelites from slavery in Egypt.  A new Paschal candle one is blessed every year and lit at Easter.  Then it us used all through Paschal season (50 days) and then on special occasion throughout the year like weddings, baptisms and funerals.  The flame of the Paschal candle symbolizes Christ as light of the world and his presence in the midst of his people. The Paschal candle is sometimes referred to as the “Easter candle” or the “Christ candle.”

If choosing white roses to blend into your centerpiece a white rose symbolizes purity, humility, and innocence perfect for the birth of Spring. It is even known as the rose of confession and the rose of servitude. White rose is a symbol of honor and reverence as well, and its arrangements are often utilized as an expression of remembrance.

So, now that you understand why these colors, how do you use them to create centerpieces?  Scaping with candles is one of my customers favorite.  We do fabulous large candle groupings by scaping colors, widths and heights.  Don’t be afraid to think outside the box.  My faithful followers, you see the trend here (THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX).  I have a display in store right now with 3″ pillars in 3″, 6″ and 9″ height all in purple, with splashes of pink and white.  Plus I have added 2″ pillars in pink & purple in both 3″ and 6″ height.  Then add collinettes in all three colors in both 5″ & 7″ height and last. I splashed a few pillars for visual depth.  If you have wee ones, floating around the house after an egg hunt, ask them to go pick you some flowers from the yard and sprinkle them in among the base.

Purple taper candle bundle

Add some hand picked flowers by base!

1>  Try this bundled arrangement in a globe but add some flowers sprigs below from the garden.

2>  Again, add some color around the base with some handpicked flowers from the garden or some bright colorful Easter eggs.

3> Colorful pink & purple flowers would work well with one or two white pillar candles in different heights.

Funny thing is as I finished this and am still working on my Easter display for store, 2 fabulous young gals came in from Chicago to get their purple pillars for Easter.  “Question was, I have two candle holders different heights, what size pillars should I use?”  We talked and she went with two 6″ to give it depth!  I only feature Root candle pillars as they are smokeless, dripless and simply are THE BEST at 16-17 hours an inch.

Have a fabulous weekend!  I will be heading shore diving hopefully before work tomorrow and definitely Monday & Tuesday, but never fear the scarf tips are coming.

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